6Feb2019

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How to make airplane travel more comfortable with hearing aids

Posted on Feb 6, 2019

If you’re about to set off on your next holiday, there’s plenty you need to take into consideration to prepare for your journey, especially if you are flying. For those who wear hearing aids, there are a few extra things to bear in mind to ensure a hassle-free experience.

Many people who are new to hearing aids may wonder whether they are able to take them through security on the way to the plane. You’ll be glad to know that unlike your belt or shoes, you don’t have to take off your hearing aids to pass through the metal detectors1. If you are concerned, you can always alert a member of security about what hearing equipment you have on your person.

In fact, it is a good idea to wear your hearing aids whilst you’re in the airport, to allow you to hear any important announcements, as well as instructions from personnel1.

On the plane

According to the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, while there are regulations regarding what electronic devices are permitted on board, hearing aids and pacemakers can be used throughout the flight2.

You may find however, that once you’re in the air, you may prefer to turn your hearing device off, due to your aids potentially amplifying the background sound of the plane engines.

What if I have tinnitus?

Tinnitus sufferers shouldn’t fear that flying will make their condition worse. In fact, many people with tinnitus find their symptoms actually become less noticeable while in the air, as the engine noise proves a distraction for the internal ringing in their ears. The British Tinnitus Association discourages the use of foam earplugs, as they can isolate the sound of your tinnitus, and can make it more prominent3.

If you’d like to check your hearing before you depart on your upcoming journey, click here to request a no cost* appointment with HEARINGLife, or call 1800 030 502.

1Hearing Direct, Using Hearing Aids On Flights. Accessed October 20, 2015.

2Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Health. Accessed October 20, 2015.

3BTA, Flying and the ear. Accessed October 20, 2015.

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