16Mar2017

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How can you protect your hearing during sports events?

Posted on Mar 16, 2017

Aussie Aussie Aussie, oi oi oi!

This particular phrase likely conjures up images of sports uniforms, crowd cheers and face paint. If there is one thing that Australians love, it's their sports.

In fact, the Australian Bureau of Statistics show that 60 per cent of us have either played sports or worked out in the past 12 months1. Meanwhile, Roy Morgan Research reveals that 10 per cent Australians do yoga regularly2, with a whopping 9 per cent of casual and serious golfers close behind3!

We already know that having hearing loss doesn't stop athletes from excelling, and so, if you wish to see a few famous Australians perform in their field, hearing loss shouldn't stop you from attending sporting events.

Don't let hearing loss stop you from attending your favourite sports games.Don't let hearing loss stop you from attending your favourite sports games.

Using hearing aids in a crowd

This March, it's likely you'll want to go check out the Sydney Carnival, Volleyfest or even the Rowing Regatta in Sydney. You've probably purchased tickets beforehand and eagerly await a spot on the bleachers to breathe in the excitement.

Protect your ears from the loud noises around you.

However, the noise levels will be rocketing off around you as fans cheer and yell in support. There may also be loudspeakers, as commentators announce the action in a booming voice. It's all rather noisy and despite the excitement, you may find that it interferes with your hearing aid.

With volumes so loud, you may not need your aids to amplify noise. Turn them off and bring along ear plugs to protect your hearing. For an added layer of sound reduction, use ear muffs on top. You'll still feel and see the excitement around you – the only difference is, your ears will thank you for it after the game.

Train your ears

A sports stadium should never be the testing ground for new hearing aids. Too much noise exposure can overwhelm your brain, especially if it's your first time using hearing aids. You need to train your ears and your brain to hear again, starting with a quiet, small environment then moving up to louder and larger environments.

That's why it's important to get the correct hearing solutions fitted as soon as possible before any big sporting events. You could be eligible for a FREE* hearing test, so click here to make a booking, or call an audiologist on 1800 030 502.

1Australian Bureau of Statistics, Participation in Sport and Physical Recreation. Accessed February, 2017.
2Roy Morgan Research, Strike a pose: Yoga is the fastest growing fitness activity. Accessed February, 2017.
3Roy Morgan Research, It's official: golf is good for you! Accessed February, 2017.

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