8Jan2015

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All about conductive hearing loss

Posted on Jan 8, 2015

Conductive hearing loss involves problems with the outer or middle ear that prevent sound being conducted properly.

This can be temporary or permanent, but in most cases hearing loss is mild or moderate, ranging from around 25 to 65 decibels.

What causes conductive hearing loss?

There are three tiny bones in the ear known as ossicles. In cases of conductive hearing loss, these are unable to conduct sound properly.

Other people may find their eardrum does not vibrate in response to sound.

These issues can be caused by the following:

• Damage to the ossicles

• Build up of wax in the ear canal

• Fluid in the ear after an ear infection

• Allergies

• Swimmer's ear

• A foreign object is stuck in the ear canal

• There is a hole in your eardrum or a scar from repeat infections

What are the symptoms of conductive hearing loss?

If you suffer from this condition you will likely experience a reduction in sound level or may struggle to hear faint sounds.

How is conductive hearing loss treated?

This condition is often treated medically or surgically.

If your hearing loss is causes by a buildup of wax in the ear, for instance, you can often have this removed by your doctor.

Make sure you do not try to scrape this out of your ear yourself, as you can push the wax further in your ear, aggravating the condition or causing further damage. If in doubt it is best to visit your local Hearing Life clinician who can check both your ears and your hearing and recommend the best course of action.

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